Title

Association between Residential Segregation and Long-Term Acute Care Hospital Performance on Improvement in Function among Ventilated Patients

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences

Publication Date

2022-01-01

Document Type

Letter to the Editor

Disciplines

Critical Care | Health Services Administration | Health Services Research | Race and Ethnicity | Translational Medical Research

Abstract

One in five survivors of critical illness who require prolonged mechanical ventilation are discharged to long-term acute care hospitals (LTCHs). Although disparities based on race and insurance have been described in LTCH use, studies have not evaluated equity in outcomes. Improvement in function (e.g., mobility) is a crucial recovery goal for patients requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation. Research in other areas has suggested that Black patients disproportionately receive care in lower-performing facilities. Whether LTCHs serving communities with more segregation achieve lower gains in functional outcomes is unknown.

In response to the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services mandated reporting of change in mobility among ventilated patients as an LTCH quality measure. We sought to examine the association between the racial composition of the neighborhood and county of an LTCH and performance on the functional mobility improvement measure.

Keywords

UMCCTS funding

DOI of Published Version

10.1513/AnnalsATS.202107-796RL

Source

Jain S, Walkey AJ, Law AC, Ferrante LE, Lindenauer PK, Krumholz HM. Association between Residential Segregation and Long-Term Acute Care Hospital Performance on Improvement in Function among Ventilated Patients. Ann Am Thorac Soc. 2022 Jan;19(1):147-150. doi: 10.1513/AnnalsATS.202107-796RL. PMID: 34644244; PMCID: PMC8787797. Link to article on publisher's site

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Annals of the American Thoracic Society

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

34644244

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