Title

Risk factors associated with suicidal ideation in newly admitted working-age nursing home residents

UMMS Affiliation

Clinical and Population Health Research PhD Program, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences; Department of Psychiatry; Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences

Publication Date

2021-12-01

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Mental and Social Health | Psychiatry | Psychiatry and Psychology | Translational Medical Research

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Suicide is a leading cause of mortality in the United States and recent initiatives have sought to increase monitoring of suicide risk within healthcare systems. Working-age adults (22-64 years) admitted to nursing homes may be at risk for suicidal ideation, yet little is known about this population.

METHODS: The national nursing home database, Minimum Dataset 3.0, was used to identify 323,436 working-age adults newly admitted to a nursing home in 2015. This cross-sectional study sought to describe sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, examine behavioral health treatment received, and determine resident characteristics associated with suicidal ideation at nursing home admission using logistic regression and reports adjusted odds ratios (aOR).

RESULTS: Suicidal ideation was present among 1.27% of newly admitted working-age residents. Almost 25% of those with suicidal ideation had no psychiatric diagnosis. Factors associated with increased odds of suicidal ideation included younger age (aOR 1.90), admission from the community (aOR 1.92) or a psychiatric hospital (aOR 2.38), cognitive impairments (aOR 1.46), pain (aOR 1.40), rejection of care (aOR 1.91), and psychiatric comorbidity (aOR depression: 1.91, anxiety disorder: 1.11, bipolar disorder: 1.62, schizophrenia: 1.32, post-traumatic stress disorder: 1.17).

LIMITATIONS: Due to the cross-sectional nature of this study, no causal inferences about suicidal ideation and the explored covariates can be made. The Minimum Dataset 3.0 has only one measure of suicidal ideation the Patient Health Questionnaire.

CONCLUSION: Factors other than psychiatric diagnosis may be important in identifying newly admitted working-age nursing home residents who require on-going suicide screening and specialized psychiatric care.

Keywords

Nursing homes, Suicidal ideation, Suicide, UMCCTS funding

DOI of Published Version

10.1016/j.jad.2021.08.042

Source

Hugunin J, Yuan Y, Rothschild AJ, Lapane KL, Ulbricht CM. Risk factors associated with suicidal ideation in newly admitted working-age nursing home residents. J Affect Disord. 2021 Dec 1;295:243-249. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2021.08.042. Epub 2021 Aug 27. PMID: 34482055; PMCID: PMC8551025. Link to article on publisher's site

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Journal of affective disorders

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

34482055

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