Title

Feasibility of a pilot, randomized controlled trial using a personalized health monitoring device with pregnant women for behavioral sleep research

UMMS Affiliation

UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science

Publication Date

2020-04-01

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Female Urogenital Diseases and Pregnancy Complications | Nursing | Telemedicine | Translational Medical Research

Abstract

Sleep disruptions are common in pregnancy and can have significant maternal and infant health consequences. Management of sleep using a personal health monitoring (PHM) device may be effective in promoting behavior change and contribute to improved pregnancy-related sleep. The purpose of this pilot, randomized controlled trial was to determine the feasibility of recruitment (i.e., recruiting a 20% minority sample, most successful recruitment methods), retention, adherence, and data collection methods with a sample of pregnant women (n = 24) at 24 weeks gestation for a 12-week intervention using a PHM device. Of 24 enrolled participants, 20 (83%) were retained through the 12-week intervention and the follow-up at 2-4 weeks postpartum. The majority of participants had a four-year education and identified as White. Ninety-one percent (n = 11) wore the device for at least ten weeks. Pregnant women may be willing engage in sleep intervention research and wear a PHM to self-monitor sleep during pregnancy. Future research should consider recruitment methods tailored to recruit diverse populations of pregnant women.

Keywords

UMCCTS funding, Behavior, Pregnancy, Sleep

DOI of Published Version

10.1016/j.apnr.2020.151246

Source

Paterno MT, Iradukunda F, Hawkins M. Feasibility of a pilot, randomized controlled trial using a personalized health monitoring device with pregnant women for behavioral sleep research. Appl Nurs Res. 2020 Apr;52:151246. doi: 10.1016/j.apnr.2020.151246. Epub 2020 Feb 20. PMID: 32199520. Link to article on publisher's site

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Applied nursing research : ANR

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

32199520

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