UMMS Affiliation

UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science

Publication Date

2018-03-31

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Agriculture | Community-Based Research | Community Health and Preventive Medicine | Health Services Administration | Health Services Research | Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene | Substance Abuse and Addiction | Translational Medical Research

Abstract

Fishing industry workers are at high risk for work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and injuries. Prescription opioids used to treat pain injuries may put these workers at increased risk for developing substance disorders. Using a Community-Based Participatory Research approach, formative research was conducted to inform the eventual development of relevant interventions to prevent and reduce opioid use disorders among fishing industry workers. Qualitative interviews (n = 21) were conducted to assess: knowledge and attitudes about opioid use disorders; features of fishing work that might affect use and/or access to treatment; and community and organizational capacity for prevention and treatment. Participants reported numerous pathways connecting commercial fishing with opioid use. The combination of high stress and physically tasking job duties requires comprehensive workplace interventions to prevent chronic pain and MSDs, in addition to tailored and culturally responsive treatment options to address opioid use disorders in this population. Public health programs must integrate workplace health and safety protection along with evidence-based primary, secondary, and tertiary interventions in order to address opioid use disorders, particularly among workers in strenuous jobs.

Keywords

community based participatory research, industry workers, opioid use disorders, prevention, workplace health, UMCCTS funding

Rights and Permissions

© 2018 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

DOI of Published Version

10.3390/ijerph15040648

Source

Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 Mar 31;15(4). pii: E648. doi: 10.3390/ijerph15040648. Link to article on publisher's site

Journal/Book/Conference Title

International journal of environmental research and public health

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

29614742

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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