UMMS Affiliation

Department of Molecular, Cell and Cancer Biology; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology; Electron Microscopy Core; Department of Radiology; Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

Publication Date

2021-02-23

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Developmental Biology | Genetics and Genomics | Reproductive and Urinary Physiology

Abstract

The X-linked gene Rlim plays major roles in female mouse development and reproduction, where it is crucial for the maintenance of imprinted X chromosome inactivation in extraembryonic tissues of embryos. However, while females carrying a systemic Rlim knockout (KO) die around implantation, male Rlim KO mice appear healthy and are fertile. Here, we report an important role for Rlim in testis where it is highly expressed in post-meiotic round spermatids as well as in Sertoli cells. Systemic deletion of the Rlim gene results in lower numbers of mature sperm that contains excess cytoplasm, leading to decreased sperm motility and in vitro fertilization rates. Targeting the conditional Rlim cKO specifically to the spermatogenic cell lineage largely recapitulates this phenotype. These results reveal functions of Rlim in male reproduction specifically in round spermatids during spermiogenesis.

Keywords

Rlim, cytoplasmic reduction, developmental biology, mouse, mouse genetics, spermiogenesis

Rights and Permissions

Copyright © 2021, Wang et al. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

DOI of Published Version

10.7554/eLife.63556

Source

Wang F, Gervasi MG, Bošković A, Sun F, Rinaldi VD, Yu J, Wallingford MC, Tourzani DA, Mager J, Zhu LJ, Rando OJ, Visconti PE, Strittmatter L, Bach I. Deficient spermiogenesis in mice lacking Rlim. Elife. 2021 Feb 23;10:e63556. doi: 10.7554/eLife.63556. PMID: 33620316; PMCID: PMC7935487. Link to article on publisher's site

Journal/Book/Conference Title

eLife

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

33620316

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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