Title

Scratching the Surface: Itching for Evidence to Reduce Surgical Health Disparities in Total Shoulder Arthroplasty

UMMS Affiliation

Division of Epidemiology, Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences

Publication Date

2020-04-01

Document Type

Editorial

Disciplines

Health Services Administration | Health Services Research | Orthopedics | Rheumatology

Abstract

Total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) is an effective procedure to improve symptoms, function, and quality of life for patients with different clinical conditions that affect the shoulder. TSA use has been increasing in the United States, but whether the short-term and longterm beneficial effects extend to all recipients is less clear. In this issue of The Journal, research by Singh and Cleveland adds to the growing body of literature evaluating the link between socioeconomic status (including insurance and income status) and postsurgical outcomes in patients with TSA. In this study, the authors conclude that public insurance, such as Medicaid and Medicare, were independently associated with more healthcare use (e.g., length of hospitalization and discharge to rehabilitation facilities) and suboptimal clinical outcomes, whereas lower income status was associated with less healthcare use and fewer postsurgical complications after TSA. The findings run counter to their hypothesis.

DOI of Published Version

10.3899/jrheum.190796

Source

Liu SH, Lapane KL. Scratching the Surface: Itching for Evidence to Reduce Surgical Health Disparities in Total Shoulder Arthroplasty. J Rheumatol. 2020 Apr;47(4):490-492. doi: 10.3899/jrheum.190796. PMID: 32238543. Link to article on publisher's site

Journal/Book/Conference Title

The Journal of rheumatology

PubMed ID

32238543

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

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