UMMS Affiliation

Department of Neurology; Department of Psychiatry

Publication Date

2019-06-28

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Mental and Social Health | Nervous System Diseases | Psychiatry | Psychiatry and Psychology | Surgical Procedures, Operative | Therapeutics

Abstract

Introduction: Surgical treatment for patients with epilepsy who do not respond to antiepileptic medication can lead to changes in behavior, including new onset of neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression and anxiety. In other cases, neuropsychiatric symptoms present before surgery may be alleviated. Because application of diagnostic criteria for primary psychiatric disorders may not be valid in assessing behavior in epilepsy populations, we sought to determine the feasibility of measuring behaviors associated with frontal-subcortical dysfunction using the Frontal Systems Behavior Scale (FrSBe) in patients who had received surgical intervention for medically refractory epilepsy.

Materials and Methods: Twenty-three patients who had previously undergone epilepsy surgery and their family member informants completed the FrSBe. The FrSBe includes separate forms for patients and informants to rate symptoms associated with three frontal lobe syndromes - executive dysfunction, disinhibition, and apathy - prior to and following a neurological condition. Patients and informants were asked to rate frontal lobe behaviors before and after epilepsy surgery using the FrSBe.

Results: Informants rated patients as showing a significantly greater reduction in apathy on the FrSBe compared to either disinhibition or executive dysfunction subscales. A trend in reduction of apathy following right hemisphere resection was found.

Conclusions: Patients who have undergone epilepsy surgery show a reduction in apathy but it is unclear whether this behavioral change is directly related to the surgical intervention. We suggest that these preliminary findings support the utility of implementing dimensional scales such as the FrSBe to study behavioral changes following epilepsy surgery.

Keywords

apathy, disinhibition, epilepsy surgery, frontal lobe, motivation, temporal lobe epilepsy

Rights and Permissions

© 2019 Mah et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms (https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php).

DOI of Published Version

10.2147/NDT.S189603

Source

Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat. 2019 Jun 28;15:1679-1684. doi: 10.2147/NDT.S189603. eCollection 2019. Link to article on publisher's site

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Neuropsychiatric disease and treatment

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

31388300

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 License

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