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Document Type

CeKTER (Center on Knowledge Translation for Employment Research)

Publication Date

2022-03-07

DOI

10.7191/pib.1180

Abstract

The U.S. Deaf community is a sociolinguistic minority group of at least 500,000 individuals who communicate using American Sign Language (ASL).1 ASL is fully distinct from English – i.e., it is not “English on the hands.” ASL is a natural, formal language with its own syntax, morphology, and structure. Members of the Deaf community identify as members of a cultural minority group with shared language, experience, history, art, and literature.

This tip sheet focuses on best practices for sharing research findings with culturally Deaf individuals who primarily use ASL. However, many of the strategies described below align with principles for universal accessibility and will, therefore, apply to a diverse range of hearing people and people with hearing loss.

Subject Area

CeKTER (Center on Knowledge Translation for Employment Research), Employment, Multicultural

Keywords

Deaf, ASL, American Sign Language, culturally Deaf, employment research, dissemination of research, universal accessibility, accessibility, research findings

Rights and Permissions

© 2022 UMass Chan Medical School.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

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