UMMS Affiliation

Department of Surgery

Publication Date

2021-09-23

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Health Policy | International Public Health | Medical Education | Surgery

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In response to the staggering global burden of conditions requiring emergency and essential surgery, the development of international surgical system strengthening (SSS) is fundamental to achieving universal, timely, quality, and affordable surgical care. Opportunity exists in identifying optimal collaborative processes that both promote global surgery research and SSS, and include medical students. This study explores an education model to engage students in academic global surgery and SSS via institutional support for longitudinal research.

OBJECTIVES: We set out to design a program to align global health education and longitudinal health systems research by creating an education model to engage medical students in academic global surgery and SSS.

PROGRAM DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION: In 2015, medical schools in the United States and Colombia initiated a collaborative partnership for academic global surgery research and SSS. This included development of two longitudinal academic tracks in global health medical education and academic global surgery, which we differentiated by level of institutional resourcing. Herein is a retrospective evaluation of the first two years of this program by using commonly recognized academic output metrics.

MAIN ACHIEVEMENTS: In the first two years of the program, there were 76 total applicants to the two longitudinal tracks. Six of the 16 (37.5%) accepted students selected global surgery faculty as mentors (Acute Care Surgery faculty participating in SSS with Colombia). These global surgery students subsequently spent 24 total working weeks abroad over the two-year period participating in culminating research experiences in SSS. As a quantitative measure of the program's success, the students collectively produced a total of twenty scholarly pieces in the form of accepted posters, abstracts, podium presentations, and manuscripts in partnership with Colombian research mentors.

POLICY IMPLICATIONS: The establishment of scholarly global health education and research tracks has afforded our medical students an active role in international SSS through participation in academic global surgery research. We propose that these complementary programs can serve as a model for disseminated education and training of the future global systems-aware surgeon workforce with bidirectional growth in south and north regions with traditionally under-resourced SSS training programs.

Keywords

Global health, Global surgery, Health systems, Medical student education, Surgical education, Systems strengthening

Rights and Permissions

Copyright © The Author(s) 2021. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

DOI of Published Version

10.1186/s41256-021-00214-2

Source

Peck GL, Hanna JS, Scott EM, Mehta D, Model Z, Sarma D, Ginalis EE, Berlant Z, Ferrera F, Escobar J, Ordoñez CA, Morales C, Gracias VH. A longitudinal surgical systems strengthening research program for medical students: the exploration of a model for global health education. Glob Health Res Policy. 2021 Sep 23;6(1):34. doi: 10.1186/s41256-021-00214-2. PMID: 34556190; PMCID: PMC8459485. Link to article on publisher's site

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Global health research and policy

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

34556190

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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