UMMS Affiliation

Department of Neurological Surgery

Publication Date

2021-08-31

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Bacteria | Environmental Public Health

Abstract

Recent recalls of stone fruit due to potential Listeria contamination and associated foodborne outbreaks highlight the risk for pathogen transmission through stone-fruit consumption. Particularly, surface contamination of fruits increases the risk for cross-contamination of produce during processing and storage. This highlights the need for quality control in stone fruits intended for consumption. To develop effective food safety practices, it is essential to determine the critical factors during stone-fruit processing that influence Listeria survival. Therefore, this study evaluated the ability of Listeria to survive on peaches and nectarines under simulated stone-fruit loading and staging, waxing and fungicide application and storage conditions. The results of our study indicate that current stone-fruit handling conditions do not favor Listeria growth. However, once fruit is contaminated, Listeria can survive on the fruit surface in significant numbers under current processing conditions. Therefore, there is a need to develop and implement preventive controls at the stone-fruit packinghouse to prevent Listeria contamination and deter pathogen persistence.

Keywords

Listeria monocytogenes, packinghouse operations, stone fruits, survival

Rights and Permissions

Copyright © 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

DOI of Published Version

10.3390/ijerph18179174

Source

Kuttappan D, Muyyarikkandy MS, Mathew E, Amalaradjou MA. Listeria monocytogenes Survival on Peaches and Nectarines under Conditions Simulating Commercial Stone-Fruit Packinghouse Operations. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021 Aug 31;18(17):9174. doi: 10.3390/ijerph18179174. PMID: 34501764; PMCID: PMC8431221. Link to article on publisher's site

Journal/Book/Conference Title

International journal of environmental research and public health

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

34501764

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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