UMMS Affiliation

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Pulmonology; Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences

Publication Date

2019-06-25

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Pediatrics | Pulmonology | Respiratory Tract Diseases

Abstract

Asthma varies considerably across the life course. Childhood asthma is known for its overall high prevalence with a male predominance prior to puberty, common remission, and rare mortality. Adult asthma is known for its female predominance, uncommon remission, and unusual mortality. Both childhood and adult asthma have variable presentations, which are described herein. Childhood asthma severity is associated with duration of asthma symptoms, medication use, lung function, low socioeconomic status, racial/ethnic minorities, and a neutrophilic phenotype. Adult asthma severity is associated with increased IgE, elevated FeNO, eosinophilia, obesity, smoking, and low socioeconomic status. Adult onset disease is associated with more respiratory symptoms and asthma medication use despite higher prebronchodilator FEV1/FVC. There is less quiescent disease in adult onset asthma and it appears to be less stable than childhood-onset disease with more relapses and less remissions.

Keywords

adult, airway, asthma, childhood, pediatric

Rights and Permissions

Copyright © 2019 Trivedi and Denton. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

DOI of Published Version

10.3389/fped.2019.00256

Source

Front Pediatr. 2019 Jun 25;7:256. doi: 10.3389/fped.2019.00256. eCollection 2019. Link to article on publisher's site

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Frontiers in pediatrics

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

31294006

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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