UMMS Affiliation

Department of Microbiology and Physiological Systems

Publication Date

2019-06-05

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins | Bacterial Infections and Mycoses | Hemic and Immune Systems | Immunology and Infectious Disease | Microbiology

Abstract

Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells typically express a TRAV1-2(+) semi-invariant TCRalpha that enables recognition of bacterial, mycobacterial, and fungal riboflavin metabolites presented by MR1. MAIT cells are associated with immune control of bacterial and mycobacterial infections in murine models. Here, we report that a population of pro-inflammatory TRAV1-2(+) CD8(+) T cells are present in the airways and lungs of healthy individuals and are enriched in bronchoalveolar fluid of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). High-throughput T cell receptor analysis reveals oligoclonal expansions of canonical and donor-unique TRAV1-2(+) MAIT-consistent TCRalpha sequences within this population. Some of these cells demonstrate MR1-restricted mycobacterial reactivity and phenotypes suggestive of MAIT cell identity. These findings demonstrate enrichment of TRAV1-2(+) CD8(+) T cells with MAIT or MAIT-like features in the airways during active TB and suggest a role for these cells in the human pulmonary immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

Keywords

Mucosal immunology, T-cell receptor, Tuberculosis

Rights and Permissions

Copyright © The Author(s) 2019. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

DOI of Published Version

10.1038/s42003-019-0442-2

Source

Commun Biol. 2019 Jun 5;2:203. doi: 10.1038/s42003-019-0442-2. eCollection 2019. Link to article on publisher's site

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Communications biology

Comments

Full author list omitted for brevity. For the full list of authors, see article.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

31231693

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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