UMMS Affiliation

Program in Bioinformatics and Integrative Biology; Division of Transfusion Medicine, Department of Medicine; Gradate School of Biomedical Sciences

Publication Date

2018-08-14

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Bioinformatics | Computational Biology | Genetic Phenomena | Immunology of Infectious Disease | Integrative Biology | Parasitic Diseases | Parasitology

Abstract

A better understanding of the drivers of the spread of malaria parasites and drug resistance across space and time is needed. These drivers can be elucidated using genetic tools. Here, a novel molecular inversion probe (MIP) panel targeting all major drug-resistance mutations and a set of microsatellites was used to genotype Plasmodium falciparum infections of 552 children from the 2013-2014 Demographic and Health Survey conducted in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Microsatellite-based analysis of population structure suggests that parasites within the DRC form a homogeneous population. In contrast, sulfadoxine-resistance markers in dihydropteroate synthase show marked spatial structure with ongoing spread of double and triple mutants compared with 2007. These findings suggest that parasites in the DRC remain panmictic despite rapidly spreading antimalarial-resistance mutations. Moreover, highly multiplexed targeted sequencing using MIPs emerges as a cost-effective method for elucidating pathogen genetics in complex infections in large cohorts.

Keywords

Democratic Republic of the Congo, malaria, drug resistance, molecular inversion probe, targeted sequencing, mutation, malaria, parasites, plasmodium falciparum, sulfadoxine

Rights and Permissions

© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

DOI of Published Version

10.1093/infdis/jiy223

Source

J Infect Dis. 2018 Aug 14;218(6):946-955. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiy223. Link to article on publisher's site

Journal/Book/Conference Title

The Journal of infectious diseases

Comments

Full author list omitted for brevity. For the full list of authors, see article.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

29718283

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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