UMMS Affiliation

Department of Quantitative Health Sciences

Publication Date

2018-08-28

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins | Biological Factors | Gender and Sexuality | Health Psychology | Medicine and Health | Psychiatry and Psychology | Race and Ethnicity

Abstract

The prevalence and severity of depression differ in women and men and across racial groups. Psychosocial factors such as chronic stress have been proposed as contributors, but causes of this variation are not fully understood. Allostatic load, a measure of the physiological burden of chronic stress, is known to be associated with depression. Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005(-)2010, we examined the associations of nine allostatic load biomarkers with depression among US black and white adults aged 18(-)64 years (n = 6431). Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Patient Health Questionaire-9; logistic models estimated adjusted odds of depression based on allostatic load biomarkers. High-risk levels of c-reactive protein were significantly associated with increased odds of depression among white women (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.1(-)2.5) and men (aOR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.1(-)2.8) but not black women (aOR = 0.8, 95% CI: 0.6(-)1.1) or men (aOR = 0.9, 95% CI: 0.5(-)1.5). Among black men, hypertension (aOR = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.1(-)2.7) and adverse serum albumin levels (aOR = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.0(-)2.9) predicted depression, while high total cholesterol was associated with depression among black women (aOR = 1.6, 95% CI: 1.0(-)2.7). The associations between allostatic load biomarkers and depression varies with gendered race, suggesting that, despite consistent symptomatology, underlying disease mechanisms may differ between these groups.

Keywords

allostatic load, chronic stress, depression, gender, intersectionality, race

Rights and Permissions

© 2018 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

DOI of Published Version

10.3390/healthcare6030105

Source

Healthcare (Basel). 2018 Aug 28;6(3). pii: E105. doi: 10.3390/healthcare6030105. Link to article on publisher's site

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Healthcare (Basel, Switzerland)

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

30154326

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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