UMMS Affiliation

Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism; Department of Medicine, Division of Diabetes; Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology

Publication Date

2018-07-03

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism | Neoplasms | Pathological Conditions, Signs and Symptoms

Abstract

Pheochromocytomas are rare tumors that arise from the adrenal medulla, with an incidence of less than 1 per 100,000 person-years. These tumors are characterized by excess catecholamine secretion and classically present with the triad of headaches, palpitations, and sweating episodes. However, the clinical presentation can be quite variable. Herein, we present a patient who presented with persistent fevers. An adrenal mass was incidentally discovered during the extensive investigation for the fever of unknown origin. Consequently, blood and urine tests were done and found to be consistent with a pheochromocytoma. The resection of this pheochromocytoma resulted in resolution of fevers. It is hypothesized that fevers in patients with pheochromocytomas occur due to the excess catecholamine or possibly due to interleukins. This clinical presentation serves as a learning point that adrenal incidentalomas in the setting of fever of unknown origin should not be ignored. It also reminds clinicians that pheochromocytomas which present with fevers may have tumor necrosis and many such patients are at risk for multisystem crises.

Rights and Permissions

Copyright © 2018 Uzma Mohammad Siddiqui et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

DOI of Published Version

10.1155/2018/3792691

Source

Case Rep Endocrinol. 2018 Jul 3;2018:3792691. doi: 10.1155/2018/3792691. eCollection 2018. Link to article on publisher's site

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Case reports in endocrinology

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

30057828

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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