UMMS Affiliation

Department of Quantitative Health Sciences

Publication Date

2018-06-01

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Alternative and Complementary Medicine | Mental and Social Health | Psychiatry | Psychiatry and Psychology

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We investigated common and dissociable neural and psychological correlates of two widely used meditation-based stress reduction programs.

METHODS: Participants were randomized to the Relaxation Response (RR; n = 18; 56% female) or the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR; n = 16; 56% female) programs. Both programs use a "bodyscan" meditation; however, the RR program explicitly emphasizes physical relaxation during this practice, whereas the MBSR program emphasizes mindful awareness with no explicit relaxation instructions. After the programs, neural activity during the respective meditation was investigated using functional magnetic resonance imaging.

RESULTS: Both programs were associated with reduced stress (for RR, from 14.1 +/- 6.6 to 11.3 +/- 5.5 [Cohen's d = 0.50; for MBSR, from 17.7 +/- 5.7 to 11.9 +/- 5.0 [Cohen's d = 1.02]). Conjunction analyses revealed functional coupling between ventromedial prefrontal regions and supplementary motor areas (p < .001). The disjunction analysis indicated that the RR bodyscan was associated with stronger functional connectivity of the right inferior frontal gyrus-an important hub of intentional inhibition and control-with supplementary motor areas (p < .001, family-wise error [FWE] rate corrected). The MBSR program was uniquely associated with improvements in self-compassion and rumination, and the within-group analysis of MBSR bodyscan revealed significant functional connectivity of the right anterior insula-an important hub of sensory awareness and salience-with pregenual anterior cingulate during bodyscan meditation compared with rest (p = .03, FWE corrected).

CONCLUSIONS: The bodyscan exercises in each program were associated with both overlapping and differential functional coupling patterns, which were consistent with each program's theoretical foundation. These results may have implications for the differential effects of these programs for the treatment of diverse conditions.

Keywords

meditation, mindfulness, mindfulness-based stress reduction program, relaxation response, bodyscan

Rights and Permissions

Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Psychosomatic Society. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

DOI of Published Version

10.1097/PSY.0000000000000590

Source

Psychosom Med. 2018 Jun;80(5):439-451. doi: 10.1097/PSY.0000000000000590. Link to article on publisher's site

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Psychosomatic medicine

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

29642115

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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