UMMS Affiliation

Department of Molecular, Cell and Cancer Biology

Publication Date

2017-09-25

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Cancer Biology | Cell Biology | Congenital, Hereditary, and Neonatal Diseases and Abnormalities | Genetic Phenomena | Molecular Biology

Abstract

Cells from Bloom's syndrome patients display genome instability due to a defective BLM and the downregulation of cytidine deaminase. Here, we use a genome-wide RNAi-synthetic lethal screen and transcriptomic profiling to identify genes enabling BLM-deficient and/or cytidine deaminase-deficient cells to tolerate constitutive DNA damage and replication stress. We found a synthetic lethal interaction between cytidine deaminase and microtubule-associated protein Tau deficiencies. Tau is overexpressed in cytidine deaminase-deficient cells, and its depletion worsens genome instability, compromising cell survival. Tau is recruited, along with upstream-binding factor, to ribosomal DNA loci. Tau downregulation decreases upstream binding factor recruitment, ribosomal RNA synthesis, ribonucleotide levels, and affects ribosomal DNA stability, leading to the formation of a new subclass of human ribosomal ultrafine anaphase bridges. We describe here Tau functions in maintaining survival of cytidine deaminase-deficient cells, and ribosomal DNA transcription and stability. Moreover, our findings for cancer tissues presenting concomitant cytidine deaminase underexpression and Tau upregulation open up new possibilities for anti-cancer treatment.Cytidine deaminase (CDA) deficiency leads to genome instability. Here the authors find a synthetic lethal interaction between CDA and the microtubule-associated protein Tau deficiencies, and report that Tau depletion affects rRNA synthesis, ribonucleotide pool balance, and rDNA stability.

Keywords

DNA damage response, Nucleolus

Rights and Permissions

© The Author(s) 2017. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

DOI of Published Version

10.1038/s41467-017-00633-1

Source

Nat Commun. 2017 Sep 25;8(1):693. doi: 10.1038/s41467-017-00633-1. Link to article on publisher's site

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Nature communications

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

28947735

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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