UMMS Affiliation

Horae Gene Therapy Center and Vector Core; Department of Microbiology and Physiological Systems

Publication Date

8-25-2017

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Cell Biology | Cellular and Molecular Physiology

Abstract

Stimulation of TNFR1 by TNFalpha can promote three distinct alternative mechanisms of cell death: necroptosis, RIPK1-independent and -dependent apoptosis. How cells decide which way to die is unclear. Here, we report that TNFalpha-induced phosphorylation of RIPK1 in the intermediate domain by TAK1 plays a key role in regulating this critical decision. Using phospho-Ser321 as a marker, we show that the transient phosphorylation of RIPK1 intermediate domain induced by TNFalpha leads to RIPK1-independent apoptosis when NF-kappaB activation is inhibited by cycloheximide. On the other hand, blocking Ser321 phosphorylation promotes RIPK1 activation and its interaction with FADD to mediate RIPK1-dependent apoptosis (RDA). Finally, sustained phosphorylation of RIPK1 intermediate domain at multiple sites by TAK1 promotes its interaction with RIPK3 and necroptosis. Thus, absent, transient and sustained levels of TAK1-mediated RIPK1 phosphorylation may represent distinct states in TNF-RSC to dictate the activation of three alternative cell death mechanisms, RDA, RIPK1-independent apoptosis and necroptosis.TNFalpha can promote three distinct mechanisms of cell death: necroptosis, RIPK1-independent and dependent apoptosis. Here the authors show that TNFalpha-induced phosphorylation of RIPK1 in the intermediate domain by TAK1 plays a key role in regulating this decision.

Keywords

Apoptosis, Necroptosis

Rights and Permissions

Copyright © The Author(s) 2017. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

DOI of Published Version

10.1038/s41467-017-00406-w

Source

Nat Commun. 2017 Aug 25;8(1):359. doi: 10.1038/s41467-017-00406-w. Link to article on publisher's site

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Nature communications

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

28842570

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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