Title

Medical management of obesity

Publication Date

2000-08-10

Document Type

Article

Subjects

Algorithms; Anti-Obesity Agents; Appetite Depressants; Basal Metabolism; Body Mass Index; Cyclobutanes; Decision Trees; Diagnosis, Differential; *Energy Intake; *Exercise; *Food Habits; Humans; Lactones; *Life Style; Lipase; Obesity; Risk Factors

Disciplines

Clinical Epidemiology | Community Health and Preventive Medicine | Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism | Preventive Medicine | Primary Care | Public Health Education and Promotion

Abstract

Obesity is one of the most common medical problems in the United States and a risk factor for illnesses such as hypertension, diabetes, degenerative arthritis and myocardial infarction. It is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality and generates great social and financial costs. Obesity is defined as a body mass index greater than 30. Many patients accomplish weight loss with diet, exercise and lifestyle modification. Others require more aggressive therapy. Weight loss medications may be appropriate for use in selected patients who meet the definition of obesity or who are overweight with comorbid conditions. Medications are formulated to reduce energy intake, increase energy output or decrease the absorption of nutrients. Drugs cannot replace diet, exercise and lifestyle modification, which remain the cornerstones of obesity treatment. Two new agents, sibutramine and orlistat, exhibit novel mechanisms of action and avoid some of the side effects that occurred with earlier drugs. Sibutramine acts to block uptake of serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine, while orlistat decreases fat absorption in the intestines.

Source

Am Fam Physician. 2000 Jul 15;62(2):419-26.

Journal/Book/Conference Title

American family physician

Related Resources

Link to article in PubMed

PubMed ID

10929704

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