Presentation Type

Presentation

Date

2020-12-03

Description

Since the advent of sound recording, people have made use of it in a variety of ways. One way in which it was very relevant for archivists and historians is interviews with a variety of people, often retirees or "the first" to do or achieve something in their Town or institution. In some cases, the interviews were left on formats that have become obsolete. They can be difficult to impossible for researchers to utilize. Adding them to your institutional repository, with an accompanying transcript, makes these items far more accessible and useful to researchers.

Keywords

institutional repositories, Northeast Institutional Repositories Day, NIRD, NIRD20, oral history

Speaker Bio(s)

Pamela O'Sullivan currently is Digital Commons Manager and Copyright Liaison at SUNY Brockport. In addition, she is part of the Scholarly Communications team and assists with library programming. When she is not saving the world from bad grammar and copyright infractions in addition to being a librarian, Pamela reads in her favorite subjects and tries out new adventures every year.

DOI

10.13028/t6k9-zz40

Rights and Permissions

Copyright © 2020 O'Sullivan

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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Dec 3rd, 10:15 AM

Listening to the past: Oral history in institutional repositories

Since the advent of sound recording, people have made use of it in a variety of ways. One way in which it was very relevant for archivists and historians is interviews with a variety of people, often retirees or "the first" to do or achieve something in their Town or institution. In some cases, the interviews were left on formats that have become obsolete. They can be difficult to impossible for researchers to utilize. Adding them to your institutional repository, with an accompanying transcript, makes these items far more accessible and useful to researchers.