Presentation Type

Lightning Talk

Date

2020-12-03

Description

In May 2019, the Cornell University Library (CUL) decided to consolidate multiple institutional repositories into a single instance (eCommons) of a single platform (DSpace) in order to utilize library resources more efficiently, and achieve local control of all of the university’s IR infrastructure and content.

This process involved the migration of over 30,000 items from two school-focused repositories running on bepress's Digital Commons platform – DigitalCommons@ILR, serving Cornell's ILR School, and the Scholarly Commons, serving the School of Hotel Administration – to eCommons. Work began on the project in February 2020, with the goal of migrating both repositories by the end of the calendar year. This effort involved librarians and staff from multiple departments and units, including CUL Information Technology, Metadata Services, the Martin P. Catherwood Library, and the Nestlé Library Library.

This lightning talk will briefly cover the conditions at Cornell that initially led to the establishment of multiple IRs, as well as the changing conditions that led to this migration and consolidation. The focus will be the challenges faced by the repository managers of the three repositories, and how they were addressed, specifically:

- Accounting for differences in features between platforms, such as readership maps and college-specific branding,

- Outreach to internal and external stakeholders regarding the change, many of whom have relied on repository support for over a decade,

- Investigating the ""skeletons in the closet"" that have accrued since DC@ILR was launched in 2004 and Scholarly Commons in 2013, and managing the myriad details necessary to establish sustainable processes and infrastructure moving forward.

Keywords

institutional repositories, Northeast Institutional Repositories Day, NIRD, NIRD20, migration

Speaker Bio(s)

Jim DelRosso is an associate librarian and the Interim Assistant Director of Cornell University’s Martin P. Catherwood Library, where he manages two open access digital repositories and provides scholarly communication, instruction, and research support to a number of academic communities. Jim is the chair of Cornell University Library’s Scholarly Communications Working Group, a member of the American Library Association’s Intellectual Freedom Committee, and on the board of the Library and Information Science Scholarship Archive (LISSA). Gail Steinhart is Open Scholarship Services Librarian at Cornell University Library, where she provides leadership for scholarly communication initiatives as the manager of Cornell's digital repository (eCommons ), journal hosting service, and thesis and dissertation publishing. She has extensive experience with research data management, Geographic Information Systems, and is a past member of the arXiv.org team. She holds M.S. degrees in Library and Information Science (Syracuse University) and Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (Cornell University).

DOI

10.13028/fv02-s955

Rights and Permissions

Copyright © 2020 Steinhart and DelRosso

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Share

COinS
 
Dec 3rd, 1:30 PM

DIY IR Migration I: Platforms, legacy practice, and outreach

In May 2019, the Cornell University Library (CUL) decided to consolidate multiple institutional repositories into a single instance (eCommons) of a single platform (DSpace) in order to utilize library resources more efficiently, and achieve local control of all of the university’s IR infrastructure and content.

This process involved the migration of over 30,000 items from two school-focused repositories running on bepress's Digital Commons platform – DigitalCommons@ILR, serving Cornell's ILR School, and the Scholarly Commons, serving the School of Hotel Administration – to eCommons. Work began on the project in February 2020, with the goal of migrating both repositories by the end of the calendar year. This effort involved librarians and staff from multiple departments and units, including CUL Information Technology, Metadata Services, the Martin P. Catherwood Library, and the Nestlé Library Library.

This lightning talk will briefly cover the conditions at Cornell that initially led to the establishment of multiple IRs, as well as the changing conditions that led to this migration and consolidation. The focus will be the challenges faced by the repository managers of the three repositories, and how they were addressed, specifically:

- Accounting for differences in features between platforms, such as readership maps and college-specific branding,

- Outreach to internal and external stakeholders regarding the change, many of whom have relied on repository support for over a decade,

- Investigating the ""skeletons in the closet"" that have accrued since DC@ILR was launched in 2004 and Scholarly Commons in 2013, and managing the myriad details necessary to establish sustainable processes and infrastructure moving forward.