Title

Assessing advantages and barriers to telemedicine adoption in the practice setting: A MyCareTeam(TM) exemplar

Publication Date

2016-6

UMMS Affiliation

Graduate School of Nursing

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Health Services Administration | Nursing | Telemedicine

Abstract

PURPOSE: Telemedicine is an evolving field that holds great potential to improve patient outcomes. The National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties core competencies now require all nurse practitioners (NPs) to be competent utilizing telemedicine to address various patient and healthcare system needs. While telemedicine offers advantages to patient care, adoption of new technologies can be challenging.

DATA SOURCES: An assessment of perceived advantages and barriers to MyCareTeam, an online diabetes management system, was conducted at an adult diabetes clinic. Two survey questionnaires were developed based on the Diffusion of Innovations (DOI) theory. The surveys were administered to patients in the clinic waiting room and sent to all clinical staff via an e-mail link.

CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this project suggested a novel way to classify patients with regard to their use of the technology with implications for practice. Recommendations include outreach to enhance knowledge and awareness of MyCareTeam, reinforcing the full scope of the system, and improved technical support.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: DOI theory is a framework that may be utilized by NPs as a tool for assessing advantages and barriers to telemedicine applications in the practice setting in order to identify strategies to promote adoption and use.

Keywords

Telemedicine, diabetes, diffusion of innovations theory, doctor of nursing practice, quality improvement

DOI of Published Version

10.1002/2327-6924.12280

Source

J Am Assoc Nurse Pract. 2016 Jun;28(6):311-9. doi: 10.1002/2327-6924.12280. Epub 2015 Jul 14. Link to article on publisher's site

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Journal of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

26178417

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