Title

Feasibility of an online cognitive behavioral therapy program to improve insomnia, mood, and quality of life in bereaved adults ages 55 and older

Publication Date

2021-01-01

UMMS Affiliation

Graduate School of Nursing

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy | Geriatric Nursing | Geriatrics | Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing | Psychiatry and Psychology | Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy

Abstract

The aim of the current study was to assess the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of utilizing an online Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I) program in bereaved older adults (ages 55 and older). Participants were randomized to receive either a 6-week online CBT-I program or six weeks of online psychoeducational modules on insomnia and grief. The sample included 30 adults with mild to severe symptoms of insomnia. Results suggest that the study was feasible to conduct, as evidenced by the brief 5-week recruitment time, 87% retention rate, and 100% completion rate of the intervention modules. There were no treatment effects by time difference shown in the study and no significant differences in study outcomes were found between the CBT-I and control groups, as both demonstrated similar improvements in insomnia. However, this study suggests that it is feasible to recruit bereaved older adults for an online educational program and successfully administer an online protocol targeting insomnia and well-being.

Keywords

Bereavement, CBT-I, Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia, Insomnia, Older adults, Psychotherapy

DOI of Published Version

10.1016/j.gerinurse.2020.12.006

Source

Godzik C, Crawford S, Ryan E. Feasibility of an online cognitive behavioral therapy program to improve insomnia, mood, and quality of life in bereaved adults ages 55 and older. Geriatr Nurs. 2020 Dec 16;42(1):99-106. doi: 10.1016/j.gerinurse.2020.12.006. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 33340917. Link to article on publisher's site

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Geriatric nursing (New York, N.Y.)

Comments

Cassandra Godzik participated in this study as a doctoral student (view her dissertation) in the Graduate School of Nursing at UMass Medical School.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

33340917

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