University of Massachusetts Medical School Faculty Publications

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Neurobiology; Alkema Lab; Francis Lab; Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

Publication Date

2021-11-12

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins | Behavioral Neurobiology

Abstract

Neuromodulators promote adaptive behaviors that are often complex and involve concerted activity changes across circuits that are often not physically connected. It is not well understood how neuromodulatory systems accomplish these tasks. Here, we show that the Caenorhabditis elegans NLP-12 neuropeptide system shapes responses to food availability by modulating the activity of head and body wall motor neurons through alternate G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) targets, CKR-1 and CKR-2. We show ckr-2 deletion reduces body bend depth during movement under basal conditions. We demonstrate CKR-1 is a functional NLP-12 receptor and define its expression in the nervous system. In contrast to basal locomotion, biased CKR-1 GPCR stimulation of head motor neurons promotes turning during local searching. Deletion of ckr-1 reduces head neuron activity and diminishes turning while specific ckr-1 overexpression or head neuron activation promote turning. Thus, our studies suggest locomotor responses to changing food availability are regulated through conditional NLP-12 stimulation of head or body wall motor circuits.

Keywords

C. elegans, G protein-coupled receptor, cholecystokinin, local search, neural circuits, neuropeptide, neuroscience

Rights and Permissions

Copyright © 2021, Ramachandran et al. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

DOI of Published Version

10.7554/eLife.71747

Source

Ramachandran S, Banerjee N, Bhattacharya R, Lemons ML, Florman J, Lambert CM, Touroutine D, Alexander K, Schoofs L, Alkema MJ, Beets I, Francis MM. A conserved neuropeptide system links head and body motor circuits to enable adaptive behavior. Elife. 2021 Nov 12;10:e71747. doi: 10.7554/eLife.71747. PMID: 34766905; PMCID: PMC8626090. Link to article on publisher's site

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Journal/Book/Conference Title

eLife

PubMed ID

34766905

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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