University of Massachusetts Medical School Faculty Publications

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Neurobiology; Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Program in Neuroscience; Department of Molecular, Cell and Cancer Biology; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology; NeuroNexus Institute; Weaver Lab

Publication Date

2021-04-05

Document Type

Article Preprint

Disciplines

Cellular and Molecular Physiology | Neuroscience and Neurobiology

Abstract

Circadian rhythms are endogenously generated physiological and molecular rhythms with a cycle length of about 24 h. Bioluminescent reporters have been exceptionally useful for studying circadian rhythms in numerous species. Here, we report development of a reporter mouse generated by modification of a widely expressed and highly rhythmic gene encoding D-site albumin promoter binding protein (Dbp). In this line of mice, firefly luciferase is expressed from the Dbp locus in a Cre-recombinase- dependent manner, allowing assessment of bioluminescence rhythms in specific cellular populations. A mouse line in which luciferase expression was Cre-independent was also generated. The Dbp reporter alleles do not alter Dbp gene expression rhythms in liver or circadian locomotor activity rhythms. In vitro and in vivo studies show the utility of the reporter alleles for monitoring rhythmicity. Our studies reveal cell-type specific characteristics of rhythms among neuronal populations within the suprachiasmatic nuclei in vitro. In vivo studies show stable Dbp-driven bioluminescence rhythms in the liver of Albumin-Cre;DbpKI/+ “liver reporter” mice. After a shift of the lighting schedule, locomotor activity achieved the proper phase relationship with the new lighting cycle more rapidly than hepatic bioluminescence did. As previously shown, restricting food access to the daytime altered the phase of hepatic rhythmicity. Our model allowed assessment of the rate of recovery from misalignment once animals were provided with food ad libitum. These studies provide clear evidence for circadian misalignment following environmental perturbations and reveal the utility of this model for minimally invasive, longitudinal monitoring of rhythmicity from specific mouse tissues.

Keywords

Physiology, Circadian rhythms

Rights and Permissions

The copyright holder for this preprint is the author/funder, who has granted bioRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license.

DOI of Published Version

10.1101/2021.04.04.438413

Source

bioRxiv 2021.04.04.438413; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.04.04.438413. Link to preprint on bioRxiv.

Comments

This article is a preprint. Preprints are preliminary reports of work that have not been certified by peer review.

Journal/Book/Conference Title

bioRxiv

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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