University of Massachusetts Medical School Faculty Publications

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Neurobiology; Alkema Lab

Publication Date

2021-04-21

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Neuroscience and Neurobiology

Abstract

Animals exhibit behavioral and neural responses that persist on longer timescales than transient or fluctuating stimulus inputs. Here, we report that Caenorhabditis elegans uses feedback from the motor circuit to a sensory processing interneuron to sustain its motor state during thermotactic navigation. By imaging circuit activity in behaving animals, we show that a principal postsynaptic partner of the AFD thermosensory neuron, the AIY interneuron, encodes both temperature and motor state information. By optogenetic and genetic manipulation of this circuit, we demonstrate that the motor state representation in AIY is a corollary discharge signal. RIM, an interneuron that is connected with premotor interneurons, is required for this corollary discharge. Ablation of RIM eliminates the motor representation in AIY, allows thermosensory representations to reach downstream premotor interneurons, and reduces the animal's ability to sustain forward movements during thermotaxis. We propose that feedback from the motor circuit to the sensory processing circuit underlies a positive feedback mechanism to generate persistent neural activity and sustained behavioral patterns in a sensorimotor transformation.

Keywords

C. elegans, corollary discharge, efferency copy, neuroscience, thermotaxis

Rights and Permissions

Copyright © 2021, Ji et al. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

DOI of Published Version

10.7554/eLife.68848

Source

Ji N, Venkatachalam V, Rodgers HD, Hung W, Kawano T, Clark CM, Lim M, Alkema MJ, Zhen M, Samuel AD. Corollary discharge promotes a sustained motor state in a neural circuit for navigation. Elife. 2021 Apr 21;10:e68848. doi: 10.7554/eLife.68848. PMID: 33880993; PMCID: PMC8139836. Link to article on publisher's site

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Journal/Book/Conference Title

eLife

PubMed ID

33880993

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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