University of Massachusetts Medical School Faculty Publications

UMMS Affiliation

Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine, Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences; UMass Worcester Prevention Research Center

Publication Date

2021-02-17

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Cardiovascular Diseases | Health Services Administration | Health Services Research | Primary Care | Race and Ethnicity

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Poor adherence to antihypertensive medications is a significant contributor to the racial gap in rates of blood pressure (BP) control among Latino adults, as compared to Black and White adults. While multi-level interventions (e.g., those aiming to influence practice, providers, and patients) have been efficacious in improving medication adherence in underserved patients with uncontrolled hypertension, the translation of these interventions into routine practice within "real world" safety-net primary care settings has been inadequate and slow. This study will fill this evidence-to-practice gap by evaluating the effectiveness of practice facilitation (PF) as a practical and tailored strategy for implementing Advancing Medication Adherence for Latinos with Hypertension through a Team-based Care Approach (ALTA), a multi-level approach to improving medication adherence and BP control in 10 safety-net practices in New York that serve Latino patients.

METHODS AND DESIGN: We will conduct this study in two phases: (1) a pre-implementation phase where we will refine the PF strategy, informed by the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research, to facilitate the implementation of ALTA into routine care at the practices; and (2) an implementation phase during which we will evaluate, in a stepped-wedge cluster randomized controlled trial, the effect of the PF strategy on ALTA implementation fidelity (primary outcome), as well as on clinical outcomes (secondary outcomes) at 12 months. Implementation fidelity will be assessed using a mixed methods approach based on the five core dimensions outlined by Proctor's Implementation Outcomes Framework. Clinical outcome measures include BP control (defined as BP < 130/80 mmHg) and medication adherence (assessed using the proportion of days covered via pharmacy records).

DISCUSSION: The study protocol applies rigorous research methods to identify how implementation strategies such as PF may work to expedite the translation process for implementing evidence-based approaches into routine care at safety-net practices to improve health outcomes in Latino patients with hypertension, who suffer disproportionately from poor BP control. By examining the barriers and facilitators that affect implementation, this study will contribute knowledge that will increase the generalizability of its findings to other safety-net practices and guide effective scale-up across primary care practices nationally.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03713515, date of registration: October 19, 2018.

Keywords

Hypertension, Medication adherence, Latino persons, Practice facilitation, Primary care

Rights and Permissions

© The Author(s). 2021 Open Access: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.

DOI of Published Version

10.1186/s43058-021-00111-2

Source

Schoenthaler A, De La Calle F, Soto A, Barrett D, Cruz J, Payano L, Rosado M, Adhikari S, Ogedegbe G, Rosal M. Bridging the evidence-to-practice gap: a stepped-wedge cluster randomized controlled trial evaluating practice facilitation as a strategy to accelerate translation of a multi-level adherence intervention into safety net practices. Implement Sci Commun. 2021 Feb 17;2(1):21. doi: 10.1186/s43058-021-00111-2. PMID: 33597041; PMCID: PMC7888171. Link to article on publisher's site

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Implementation science communications

PubMed ID

33597041

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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