University of Massachusetts Medical School Faculty Publications

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Pathology

Publication Date

2018-05-08

Document Type

Article Preprint

Disciplines

Bioinformatics | Genetic Phenomena | Hemic and Immune Systems | Immunopathology

Abstract

Studies in mouse have shed important light on human hematopoietic differentiation and disease. However, substantial differences between the two species often limit the translation of findings from mouse to human. Here, we compare modules of co-expressed genes in human and mouse immune cells based on compendia of genome-wide profiles. We show that the overall modular organization of the transcriptional program is conserved. We highlight modules of co-expressed genes in one species that dissolve or split in the other species. Many of the associated regulatory mechanisms - as reflected by computationally inferred trans regulators, or enriched cis-regulatory elements - are conserved between the species. Nevertheless, the degree of conservation in regulatory mechanism is lower than that of expression, suggesting that distinct regulation may underlie some of the conserved transcriptional responses.

Keywords

bioinformatics, mice, immune systems, transcriptional programs, genes

Rights and Permissions

The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not peer-reviewed) is the author/funder. It is made available under a CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license.

DOI of Published Version

10.1101/286211

Source

bioRxiv 286211; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/286211. Link to preprint on bioRxiv service.

Comments

Kavitha Narayan, Katelyn Sylvia and Joonsoo Kang are members of the ImmGen Consortium.

Journal/Book/Conference Title

bioRxiv

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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