Poster Session

Date

2016-04-06

Description

The purpose of this paper is to examine challenges in acquiring US and international greenhouse gas GIS and remotely sensed data for research and active learning activities focused on climate science. Acquisition and use of NASA data sources for mapping atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and the extent of their data curation, discovery systems, and formal publication using persistent identifier are evaluated. A sample of data sets are examined to determine bottlenecks in reuse of these data sets as well as potential instances of inappropriate use. The parameters of scale, resolution, atmospheric column type, lack of cartographic knowledge, and selection of covarying atmospheric variables are found to be areas for potential bottlenecks for novice and moderately experienced users. These issues represent a significant challenge in an escience workflow, particularly in reuse and data provenance lineages. However, they can be mitigated by effective data information literacy trainings and support materials.

Keywords

environmental science, geoscience, atmospheric science, data information literacy, GIS, visualization, remotely sensed data

DOI

10.13028/faw6-td50

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Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

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Apr 6th, 12:00 AM

Assessment of Potential Limits to Effective eScience Use of Greenhouse Gas Data Sets

The purpose of this paper is to examine challenges in acquiring US and international greenhouse gas GIS and remotely sensed data for research and active learning activities focused on climate science. Acquisition and use of NASA data sources for mapping atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and the extent of their data curation, discovery systems, and formal publication using persistent identifier are evaluated. A sample of data sets are examined to determine bottlenecks in reuse of these data sets as well as potential instances of inappropriate use. The parameters of scale, resolution, atmospheric column type, lack of cartographic knowledge, and selection of covarying atmospheric variables are found to be areas for potential bottlenecks for novice and moderately experienced users. These issues represent a significant challenge in an escience workflow, particularly in reuse and data provenance lineages. However, they can be mitigated by effective data information literacy trainings and support materials.