Poster Session

Date

2016-04-06

Description

Objective: This case study aims to identify data management needs in archaeological research by examining one project’s current practices.

Context: Archaeologists working at academic institutions in the United States frequently conduct excavations in foreign countries. Primary Investigators are required to comply with permit requirements and laws of the host country, which may pertain to the data collected or published. There are also logistical challenges in obtaining, storing, and sharing data among international collaborators. Tel Kabri was a Middle Bronze Age palace near the Mediterranean coast. Excavations started in the 1980s, and apply a range of technologies and methods to gain a holistic understanding of daily life and trade at Kabri.

Methods: An interview instrument, based on the Digital Curation Centre’s Checklist for a Data Management Plan 4.0, was developed and used in an interview with lead staff to focus on understanding the project’s data workflow throughout the data lifecycle.

Results: Recommendations for a Data Management Plan were made: data will be imported to software that can manage multiple file types, assign metadata, and provide versioning control; all data will be duplicated and stored in a U.S.-based repository or cloud-based storage service; re-use is subject to approval of the PIs and may be requested by contacting the PIs or the Israel Antiquities Authority; data in paper notebooks will be digitized; data will be stored in open-source formats where possible; Israel Antiquities Authority will be responsible for storing, archiving, and preserving all materials.

Conclusions: Archaeology as a discipline is centered on the importance of context and data preservation. Partnering with archaeologists may allow LIS professionals to pursue a model for global data services that addresses the complexities of collecting data in foreign countries, incorporating legacy data, and preserving multiple data types.

Keywords

data management, archaeology, Israel, Tel Kabri

Comments

This poster was awarded "Best Student Poster" at the 2016 e-Science Symposium.

DOI

10.13028/vs9g-pj97

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Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

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Apr 6th, 12:00 AM

Excavations at Tel Kabri, Israel: A Case Study in Data Management for Archaeological Research

Objective: This case study aims to identify data management needs in archaeological research by examining one project’s current practices.

Context: Archaeologists working at academic institutions in the United States frequently conduct excavations in foreign countries. Primary Investigators are required to comply with permit requirements and laws of the host country, which may pertain to the data collected or published. There are also logistical challenges in obtaining, storing, and sharing data among international collaborators. Tel Kabri was a Middle Bronze Age palace near the Mediterranean coast. Excavations started in the 1980s, and apply a range of technologies and methods to gain a holistic understanding of daily life and trade at Kabri.

Methods: An interview instrument, based on the Digital Curation Centre’s Checklist for a Data Management Plan 4.0, was developed and used in an interview with lead staff to focus on understanding the project’s data workflow throughout the data lifecycle.

Results: Recommendations for a Data Management Plan were made: data will be imported to software that can manage multiple file types, assign metadata, and provide versioning control; all data will be duplicated and stored in a U.S.-based repository or cloud-based storage service; re-use is subject to approval of the PIs and may be requested by contacting the PIs or the Israel Antiquities Authority; data in paper notebooks will be digitized; data will be stored in open-source formats where possible; Israel Antiquities Authority will be responsible for storing, archiving, and preserving all materials.

Conclusions: Archaeology as a discipline is centered on the importance of context and data preservation. Partnering with archaeologists may allow LIS professionals to pursue a model for global data services that addresses the complexities of collecting data in foreign countries, incorporating legacy data, and preserving multiple data types.