Title

Pigmented basal cell carcinoma: investigation of 70 cases

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Medicine, Division of Dermatology

Publication Date

7-1-1992

Document Type

Article

Subjects

Biopsy; Carcinoma, Basal Cell; Humans; Melanins; Melanocytes; Skin; Skin Neoplasms; Staining and Labeling

Disciplines

Dermatology | Neoplasms | Skin and Connective Tissue Diseases

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Pigmented basal cell carcinoma (PBCC) is a clinical and histologic variant of BCC.

OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to identify the histologic subtypes of BCC that were most often associated with pigment and to determine whether this correlated with outcome after excision.

METHODS: A series of PBCC was identified and the histologic subtype noted. Margins of all excisions were examined for residual tumor. These results were then compared with a series of nonpigmented BCCs.

RESULTS: In a series of 1039 consecutive BCCs, 70 (6.7%) contained pigment. The histologic growth pattern most frequently associated with pigment was the nodular/micronodular pattern (12.4%) followed by the nodular (7.7%), superficial (7.2%), micronodular (4.0%), and the nodular/micronodular/infiltrative (3.4%) patterns. Margins were examined for evidence of residual tumor in the 40 cases that were excised. In only one case (2.5%) was the margin positive for tumor. This was statistically significant (p less than 0.05) compared with 388 excisions of nonpigmented BCCs with comparable growth patterns in which 69 (17.7%) showed positive margins.

CONCLUSION: PBCC, as a clinical variant, is more frequently excised with adequate margins than are tumors of comparable histologic subtypes that do not contain pigment.

DOI of Published Version

10.1016/0190-9622(92)70160-H

Source

J Am Acad Dermatol. 1992 Jul;27(1):74-8. doi:10.1016/0190-9622(92)70160-H

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology

Comments

At the time of publication, Mary E. Maloney was not yet affiliated with the University of Massachusetts Medical School.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

1377719

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