Poster Session

Date

2017-05-16

Document Type

Poster Abstract

Description

Introduction: Greater burden of pericardial fat is associated with increased body mass index (BMI). Obesity is associated with unfavorable metabolic characteristics such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, and glucose intolerance. We sought to determine whether unfavorable metabolic profile alone, in the absence of excess BMI, was itself associated with increased pericardial fat thickness (PFT).

Methods:From the 1,794 Framingham Offspring cohort adults who underwent cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), we identified 446 free of non-skin cancer and prevalent clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) who had 18.5≤BMI2and complete covariates. We calculated a metabolic score (MS) based on ATPIII criteria where 1 point was assigned for each of: a) fasting glucose≥100 mg/dL or diabetes; b) SBP≥130 or DBP≥85 mmHg or antihypertensive treatment; c) triglycerides≥150 mg/dL; d) HDL cholesterol <40(M)/

Results: PFT increased with worsening metabolic score at the fixed locations of the apical and mid-level RV, as well as at maximal PFT. On pairwise comparisons, only the MS3+ group had PFT that was consistently significantly greater than that of MS0.

Conclusions: In a community-dwelling cohort, among participants who were free of cancer and clinical CVD and had normal-range or BMI, worsening metabolic profile was associated with increased pericardial fat thickness.

Keywords

pericardial fat thickness, Framingham heart study, body mass index, cardiac magnetic resonance

DOI

10.13028/yv4y-xk67

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May 16th, 1:45 PM

Pericardial Fat Thickness Increases with Greater Burden of Adverse Metabolic Factors Among Adults with Normal-Range Body Mass Index: The Framingham Heart Study

Introduction: Greater burden of pericardial fat is associated with increased body mass index (BMI). Obesity is associated with unfavorable metabolic characteristics such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, and glucose intolerance. We sought to determine whether unfavorable metabolic profile alone, in the absence of excess BMI, was itself associated with increased pericardial fat thickness (PFT).

Methods:From the 1,794 Framingham Offspring cohort adults who underwent cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), we identified 446 free of non-skin cancer and prevalent clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) who had 18.5≤BMI2and complete covariates. We calculated a metabolic score (MS) based on ATPIII criteria where 1 point was assigned for each of: a) fasting glucose≥100 mg/dL or diabetes; b) SBP≥130 or DBP≥85 mmHg or antihypertensive treatment; c) triglycerides≥150 mg/dL; d) HDL cholesterol <40(M)/

Results: PFT increased with worsening metabolic score at the fixed locations of the apical and mid-level RV, as well as at maximal PFT. On pairwise comparisons, only the MS3+ group had PFT that was consistently significantly greater than that of MS0.

Conclusions: In a community-dwelling cohort, among participants who were free of cancer and clinical CVD and had normal-range or BMI, worsening metabolic profile was associated with increased pericardial fat thickness.