Poster Session

Date

2017-05-16

Document Type

Poster Abstract

Description

Patients with heart failure (HF) exhibit baroreflex dysfunction, which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Orthostatic hypotension, a decrease in blood pressure (BP) upon standing, is a condition that often occurs in HF, and may be linked with altered baroreflex responsiveness in this population. However, data on baroreflex-mediated cardiovascular responses to acute hypotension in HF patients are limited. Therefore, 8 HF patients (7 men; mean±SEM 65±3y; ejection fraction 30.5±3.1%) and 7 healthy control (CON) adults (6 men; 65±2y) underwent 7.5 minutes of unilateral lower-limb ischemia via inflation of a thigh cuff on one leg to non-pharmacologically induce acute hypotension upon cuff deflation. Beat-to-beat systolic BP, diastolic BP, and mean arterial BP (MAP; photoplethysmographic finger cuff) and heart rate (HR; electrocardiogram) were recorded continuously before, during, and after cuff inflation. Statistical analysis involved independent-samples t-tests. Baseline values were not different between groups (systolic BP: 128±8 vs. 128±4mmHg; diastolic BP: 73±3 vs. 82±5mmHg; MAP: 90±3 vs. 97±4mmHg; HR: 62±2 vs. 56±2b.min-1 for HF and CON, respectively; P>0.05). The magnitude of the induced decrease in MAP was similar in both groups (HF -11±1 vs. CON -12±2mmHg; P>0.05). However, the time-to-peak MAP decrease was significantly longer in HF compared to CON (HF 11±2 vs. CON 6±1s; PP>0.05). However, the time-to-peak HR increase was longer in HF compared to CON (HF 9±1 vs. CON 6±1s; PP>0.05). However, the time-to-peak HR increase was longer in HF compared to CON (HF 9±1 vs. CON 6±1s; P

Keywords

heart failure, acute hypotension

DOI

10.13028/4x0q-5632

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May 16th, 1:45 PM

Altered Baroreflex-Mediated Cardiovascular Responses to Acute Hypotension in Heart Failure Patients Compared to Healthy Adults

Patients with heart failure (HF) exhibit baroreflex dysfunction, which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Orthostatic hypotension, a decrease in blood pressure (BP) upon standing, is a condition that often occurs in HF, and may be linked with altered baroreflex responsiveness in this population. However, data on baroreflex-mediated cardiovascular responses to acute hypotension in HF patients are limited. Therefore, 8 HF patients (7 men; mean±SEM 65±3y; ejection fraction 30.5±3.1%) and 7 healthy control (CON) adults (6 men; 65±2y) underwent 7.5 minutes of unilateral lower-limb ischemia via inflation of a thigh cuff on one leg to non-pharmacologically induce acute hypotension upon cuff deflation. Beat-to-beat systolic BP, diastolic BP, and mean arterial BP (MAP; photoplethysmographic finger cuff) and heart rate (HR; electrocardiogram) were recorded continuously before, during, and after cuff inflation. Statistical analysis involved independent-samples t-tests. Baseline values were not different between groups (systolic BP: 128±8 vs. 128±4mmHg; diastolic BP: 73±3 vs. 82±5mmHg; MAP: 90±3 vs. 97±4mmHg; HR: 62±2 vs. 56±2b.min-1 for HF and CON, respectively; P>0.05). The magnitude of the induced decrease in MAP was similar in both groups (HF -11±1 vs. CON -12±2mmHg; P>0.05). However, the time-to-peak MAP decrease was significantly longer in HF compared to CON (HF 11±2 vs. CON 6±1s; PP>0.05). However, the time-to-peak HR increase was longer in HF compared to CON (HF 9±1 vs. CON 6±1s; PP>0.05). However, the time-to-peak HR increase was longer in HF compared to CON (HF 9±1 vs. CON 6±1s; P