Mini Symposia Presentations

Date

2014-05-20

Document Type

Presentation

Description

Mounting evidence suggests that particular aspects of human health and disease may be attributable to the trillions of microbes that inhabit our gastrointestinal tract, collectively referred to as the gut microbiota. Evidence suggests that pathologic changes to the microbiota (termed “dysbiosis”) are associated with a wide variety of medical outcomes, and therefore therapeutic manipulation of the microbiota is a major area of research interest. As part of the mini-symposium entitled "Manipulating the Gut Microbiome for Human Health," Dr. Olendzki presents on the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Anti-Inflammatory Diet (IBD-AID).

Keywords

Inflammatory Bowel Disease, IBD, diet

Comments

Presented at the 2014 UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science Research Retreat, held on May 20, 2014 at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Mass.

DOI

10.13028/qfk3-vf03

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May 20th, 4:00 PM

The Guts and Bolts of the Diet and a Look into the Microbiome

Mounting evidence suggests that particular aspects of human health and disease may be attributable to the trillions of microbes that inhabit our gastrointestinal tract, collectively referred to as the gut microbiota. Evidence suggests that pathologic changes to the microbiota (termed “dysbiosis”) are associated with a wide variety of medical outcomes, and therefore therapeutic manipulation of the microbiota is a major area of research interest. As part of the mini-symposium entitled "Manipulating the Gut Microbiome for Human Health," Dr. Olendzki presents on the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Anti-Inflammatory Diet (IBD-AID).