Date

2013-05-08

Document Type

Poster Abstract

Description

Introduction: Total hip (THA) and knee (TKA) arthroplasty are highly successful treatments for end-stage arthritis. However, a subset of patients experience suboptimal post-operative gain in function. 1, 2 Previous studies have shown that pre-operative emotional health influences outcomes after TKA,3 but there is limited evidence on THA patients. We hypothesized that pre-operative emotional health does not affect patient satisfaction in THA patients.

Methods: A secondary analysis of an existing registry at UMass of primary THA patients between 2008 and 2011 was conducted. Baseline demographic, clinical, emotional health (SF-36 MCS), and physical health (SF-36 PCS) data were collected electronically at the pre-operative visit. Post-operative SF-36 MCS, SF-36 PCS, and satisfaction scores were collected electronically between 6 months through 2 years follow-up. Bivariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression models were used.

Results: The analysis included 316 primary THA patients with mean age 62±11 years, 55% female, mean BMI 30±5, mean PCS 31±8, and mean MCS 51±11. Patients with lower baseline emotional health scores reported significantly reduced mean post-operative physical function and emotional health (p45 (indicating excellent function, national norm = 50); whereas patients with baseline MCS≥50 had a mean 17±11 point increase in post-operative PCS with 71% of these patients reporting PCS>45 (p<0.001).

Conclusion: In THA patients, post-operative emotional health and physical health are positively correlated with baseline emotional health, however post-operative patient satisfaction remains independent of baseline emotional health.

DOI

10.13028/phv5-3478

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May 8th, 12:30 PM May 8th, 1:30 PM

Pre-operative Emotional Health Affects Post-operative Patient Function but not Patient Satisfaction Following Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

Introduction: Total hip (THA) and knee (TKA) arthroplasty are highly successful treatments for end-stage arthritis. However, a subset of patients experience suboptimal post-operative gain in function. 1, 2 Previous studies have shown that pre-operative emotional health influences outcomes after TKA,3 but there is limited evidence on THA patients. We hypothesized that pre-operative emotional health does not affect patient satisfaction in THA patients.

Methods: A secondary analysis of an existing registry at UMass of primary THA patients between 2008 and 2011 was conducted. Baseline demographic, clinical, emotional health (SF-36 MCS), and physical health (SF-36 PCS) data were collected electronically at the pre-operative visit. Post-operative SF-36 MCS, SF-36 PCS, and satisfaction scores were collected electronically between 6 months through 2 years follow-up. Bivariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression models were used.

Results: The analysis included 316 primary THA patients with mean age 62±11 years, 55% female, mean BMI 30±5, mean PCS 31±8, and mean MCS 51±11. Patients with lower baseline emotional health scores reported significantly reduced mean post-operative physical function and emotional health (p45 (indicating excellent function, national norm = 50); whereas patients with baseline MCS≥50 had a mean 17±11 point increase in post-operative PCS with 71% of these patients reporting PCS>45 (p<0.001).

Conclusion: In THA patients, post-operative emotional health and physical health are positively correlated with baseline emotional health, however post-operative patient satisfaction remains independent of baseline emotional health.