Date

2012-05-22

Document Type

Poster Abstract

Description

Objectives: We sought to examine primary care providers’ gout knowledge and reported treatment patterns in comparison to current treatment recommendations.

Methods: We conducted a national survey of a random sample of primary care physicians (internists and family practitioners) to assess their treatment of acute, intercritical, and tophaceous gout in comparison to published European and American gout treatment recommendations and guidelines.

Results: There were 838 respondents (response rate of 41%) most of whom worked in private practice (63%) with >16 years experience (52%). For acute podagra, 16% reported care consistent with the recommendations including avoidance of anti-inflammatory drugs in the setting of renal insufficiency, use of colchicine at a dose of ≤ 1.8mg a day, and no initiation of a urate-lowering drug (ULD) during an acute attack (internists 21% vs. family practitioners 11%, p

Conclusion: While internists were more likely than family practitioners to suggest recommended care, the majority of physicians did not report optimal treatment practices, suggesting further education is needed.

DOI

10.13028/jbbs-ac18

Rights and Permissions

Copyright the Author(s)

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

Share

COinS
 
May 22nd, 4:30 PM May 22nd, 6:00 PM

Gout Knowledge, Beliefs and Treatment Practices in a National Sample of US Primary Care Providers

Objectives: We sought to examine primary care providers’ gout knowledge and reported treatment patterns in comparison to current treatment recommendations.

Methods: We conducted a national survey of a random sample of primary care physicians (internists and family practitioners) to assess their treatment of acute, intercritical, and tophaceous gout in comparison to published European and American gout treatment recommendations and guidelines.

Results: There were 838 respondents (response rate of 41%) most of whom worked in private practice (63%) with >16 years experience (52%). For acute podagra, 16% reported care consistent with the recommendations including avoidance of anti-inflammatory drugs in the setting of renal insufficiency, use of colchicine at a dose of ≤ 1.8mg a day, and no initiation of a urate-lowering drug (ULD) during an acute attack (internists 21% vs. family practitioners 11%, p

Conclusion: While internists were more likely than family practitioners to suggest recommended care, the majority of physicians did not report optimal treatment practices, suggesting further education is needed.