UMMS Affiliation

Center for Integrated Primary Care; Department of Family Medicine and Community Health

Publication Date

3-31-2008

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Alternative and Complementary Medicine | Behavioral Medicine | Dietetics and Clinical Nutrition | Health Psychology | Integrative Medicine | Primary Care | Psychiatry and Psychology

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Little is known about the prevalence of dietary supplement (DS) use in American adolescents. We conducted this study to analyze the prevalence of DS use and factors associated with this use in a national population-based sample.

METHODS: We used data from the 1999 - 2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) for adolescents age 11 to 19. Using weighted logistic regression, we identified demographic and clinical factors associated with the use of any DS, vitamins or minerals, herbs and other DS.

RESULTS: Among the 5,306 responses representing approximately 36 million Americans 11-19 years old, 27% reported use of one or more DS in the prior month. The most commonly used DS were: multivitamins (16%) and vitamin C (6%). In the multivariable analysis, African American [adjusted odds ratio 0.40 (0.31-0.50) 95% CI] and Mexican American [0.55 (0.44-0.69)] adolescents were less likely to use DS compared with non-Hispanic whites. DS use was more common in those who used prescription medications [1.37 (1.10-1.72)] and among those who had a diagnosis of chronic headaches [1.25 (1.04-1.50)]. DS use was less common among those reporting fair or poor health status [0.59 (0.40-0.88)].

CONCLUSION: Twenty seven percent of American adolescents use DS. DS use is higher among teens that use prescription medications; physicians and pharmacists should be aware of this, ask patients, and check for potential interactions.

Keywords

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Dietary Supplement, Prescription Medication, Specific Health Condition

Rights and Permissions

© 2008 Gardiner et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

DOI of Published Version

10.1186/1472-6882-8-9

Source

BMC Complement Altern Med. 2008 Mar 31;8:9. doi: 10.1186/1472-6882-8-9. Link to article on publisher's site

Journal/Book/Conference Title

BMC complementary and alternative medicine

Comments

At the time of publication, Paula Gardiner was not yet affiliated with the University of Massachusetts Medical School.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

18377653

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