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Date

2020-10-14

Document Type

Video

Description

The Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) and Re-entry Initiative was one of several projects funded in 2018 by the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to expand capacity to deliver medications to treat opioid use disorder (MOUD). Nationwide, the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office (FCSO) was the only criminal justice institution to be awarded a grant. The project created a new criminal justice-engaged evaluation and research collaborative in Western Massachusetts that now involves the University of Massachusetts Amherst (UMass), the Hampshire County House of Corrections, and several community-based providers of health and social services. Building on this foundation, the collaborative is now a key component of several NIH-funded research projects. Presenters will provide an overview of the SAMHSA-funded project, report on findings, and present lessons learned from the first year of implementation. This session will also provide guidance on how to launch, sustain, and grow criminal justice-engaged evaluation and research collaboratives.

Keywords

criminal justice-engaged research and evaluation, collaboration, criminal justice, medication-assisted treatment, substance abuse, opioid use disorder

DOI

10.13028/5w0c-vv51

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Copyright 2020 the Author(s)

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

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Oct 14th, 1:00 PM

A criminal justice-engaged research collaborative: Findings and lessons learned from Western Massachusetts

The Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) and Re-entry Initiative was one of several projects funded in 2018 by the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to expand capacity to deliver medications to treat opioid use disorder (MOUD). Nationwide, the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office (FCSO) was the only criminal justice institution to be awarded a grant. The project created a new criminal justice-engaged evaluation and research collaborative in Western Massachusetts that now involves the University of Massachusetts Amherst (UMass), the Hampshire County House of Corrections, and several community-based providers of health and social services. Building on this foundation, the collaborative is now a key component of several NIH-funded research projects. Presenters will provide an overview of the SAMHSA-funded project, report on findings, and present lessons learned from the first year of implementation. This session will also provide guidance on how to launch, sustain, and grow criminal justice-engaged evaluation and research collaboratives.