Date

2019-03-22

Document Type

Poster

Description

Background: Every year approximately 2 million patients are seen in US EDs for suspected renal colic, and the majority receive CT scans. The objective of our study was to develop a stakeholder-informed conversation aid to help clinicians use SDM regarding CT scanning in patients with suspected renal colic.

Methods: Using a published decision aid development framework, and under the direction of a multi-disciplinary Steering Committee, we engaged a diverse set of stakeholders via qualitative methods. EM clinicians, urologists, radiologists, researchers, and emergency department patients participated in focus groups and semi-structured interviews. All groups were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed in an iterative process by a four-person coding team. Emergent themes were identified and used to develop a decision aid which was iteratively refined.

Results: A total of 8 interviews and 7 focus groups were conducted with 36 stakeholders (including local ED patients) The following three themes emerged: 1. Patient participants reported a desire to be involved in this decision and wanted more information regarding risks and benefits of CT scans. 2. Clinicians were comfortable diagnosing kidney stones without a CT scan, however, some felt that clinical uncertainty was a barrier to SDM. 3. All stakeholders identified strategies to facilitate this conversation such as check-lists and visual aids.

Conclusion: Using stakeholder input, we developed a communication tool to facilitate an SDM conversation around the use of CT in suspected renal colic. Further testing will assess whether this tool can safely improve patient engagement and decrease low yield CT usage.

Keywords

renal colic, CT scan, emergency medicine, shared decision making tool, kidney stones, urology, radiology

DOI

10.13028/m5sv-q716

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

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Mar 22nd, 12:00 PM

Engaging Emergency Department Patients in the Creation of a Shared Decision-­Making Tool Regarding CT Scanning in Kidney Stones: Challenges to Traditional Stakeholder Engagement

Background: Every year approximately 2 million patients are seen in US EDs for suspected renal colic, and the majority receive CT scans. The objective of our study was to develop a stakeholder-informed conversation aid to help clinicians use SDM regarding CT scanning in patients with suspected renal colic.

Methods: Using a published decision aid development framework, and under the direction of a multi-disciplinary Steering Committee, we engaged a diverse set of stakeholders via qualitative methods. EM clinicians, urologists, radiologists, researchers, and emergency department patients participated in focus groups and semi-structured interviews. All groups were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed in an iterative process by a four-person coding team. Emergent themes were identified and used to develop a decision aid which was iteratively refined.

Results: A total of 8 interviews and 7 focus groups were conducted with 36 stakeholders (including local ED patients) The following three themes emerged: 1. Patient participants reported a desire to be involved in this decision and wanted more information regarding risks and benefits of CT scans. 2. Clinicians were comfortable diagnosing kidney stones without a CT scan, however, some felt that clinical uncertainty was a barrier to SDM. 3. All stakeholders identified strategies to facilitate this conversation such as check-lists and visual aids.

Conclusion: Using stakeholder input, we developed a communication tool to facilitate an SDM conversation around the use of CT in suspected renal colic. Further testing will assess whether this tool can safely improve patient engagement and decrease low yield CT usage.

 

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