Date

2019-03-22

Document Type

Poster

Description

Background: Optimum management after an Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) requires considerable patient engagement/activation. Religious practices permeate people's lives and may influence engagement in their healthcare. Little is known about the relationship between religiosity and patient activation in hospital survivors of an ACS.

Methods: We recruited patients hospitalized for an ACS at six medical centers in Central Massachusetts and Georgia (2011-2013). Participants self-reported three measures of religiosity - strength and comfort from religion, making petition prayers, and awareness of intercessory prayers for health. Patient activation was assessed using the 6-item Patient Activation Measure (PAM-6). We categorized participants as either having low (levels 1 and 2) or high (levels 3 and 4) activation in examining the association between religiosity and patient activation while adjusting for sociodemographic, psychosocial, and clinical variables.

Results: Patients (n=2,067) were on average, 61 years old, 34% were women, and 81% were non-Hispanic White. Approximately 85% reported deriving strength and comfort from religion, two-thirds prayed for their health, and 89% received intercessions for their health. Overall, 57.5% had low activation. Reports of a great deal (aOR: 2.02; 95% CI: 1.44-2.84), and little/some (aOR: 1.45; 95% CI: 1.07-1.98) strength and comfort from religion were associated with high activation respectively, as was the receipt of intercessions (aOR: 1.48; 95% CI: 1.07-2.05). Praying for one's health was associated with low activation (aOR: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.61-0.99).

Conclusion and Clinical Practice Implications: Patient activation was associated with religiosity, suggesting that healthcare providers may use this knowledge to enhance patient engagement in their care.

Keywords

Acute Coronary Syndrome, ACS, religiosity, religion, spirituality, patient engagement

DOI

10.13028/vb4f-cr19

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Mar 22nd, 12:00 PM

Religiosity and Patient Engagement in their Healthcare Among Hospital Survivors of an Acute Coronary Syndrome

Background: Optimum management after an Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) requires considerable patient engagement/activation. Religious practices permeate people's lives and may influence engagement in their healthcare. Little is known about the relationship between religiosity and patient activation in hospital survivors of an ACS.

Methods: We recruited patients hospitalized for an ACS at six medical centers in Central Massachusetts and Georgia (2011-2013). Participants self-reported three measures of religiosity - strength and comfort from religion, making petition prayers, and awareness of intercessory prayers for health. Patient activation was assessed using the 6-item Patient Activation Measure (PAM-6). We categorized participants as either having low (levels 1 and 2) or high (levels 3 and 4) activation in examining the association between religiosity and patient activation while adjusting for sociodemographic, psychosocial, and clinical variables.

Results: Patients (n=2,067) were on average, 61 years old, 34% were women, and 81% were non-Hispanic White. Approximately 85% reported deriving strength and comfort from religion, two-thirds prayed for their health, and 89% received intercessions for their health. Overall, 57.5% had low activation. Reports of a great deal (aOR: 2.02; 95% CI: 1.44-2.84), and little/some (aOR: 1.45; 95% CI: 1.07-1.98) strength and comfort from religion were associated with high activation respectively, as was the receipt of intercessions (aOR: 1.48; 95% CI: 1.07-2.05). Praying for one's health was associated with low activation (aOR: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.61-0.99).

Conclusion and Clinical Practice Implications: Patient activation was associated with religiosity, suggesting that healthcare providers may use this knowledge to enhance patient engagement in their care.

 

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