Title

Physician-based smoking intervention: a rededication to a five-step strategy to smoking research

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine

Date

1-14-1998

Document Type

Article

Subjects

Humans; *Physician-Patient Relations; *Smoking Cessation; Tobacco Use Disorder

Disciplines

Life Sciences | Medicine and Health Sciences | Women's Studies

Abstract

It is well established that physicians can have a significant effect on the smoking behavior of their patients. To do this, attention must be paid to putting in place multiple strategies or mechanisms in the organization where the physician practices, as well as in the macroenvironment (i.e., social and public policy). It has been questioned whether or not there is stagnation in the field of clinical smoking intervention requiring a rededication to basic research regarding smoking. With respect to physician-based smoking intervention, we alternatively suggest that recommitment to all phases of research is essential for moving forward physician-based smoking interventions in the rapidly changing health services and social environment. In this article, we first review the essential framework of the National Cancer Institute's research science approach to cancer prevention and control. Evidence concerning physician-based interventions is then reviewed, followed by a schematic of a comprehensive framework for thinking about the process and intervention components needed for physician-based smoking intervention to take place in the health-care setting, the impact they have, and the eventual outcome of such interventions. There is a discussion of the challenges for the delivery of smoking-cessation services presented by the rapidly changing healthy delivery system of the 1990s. Finally, we present recommendations concerning research priorities for physician-based smoking intervention and the research funding process.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Addict Behav. 1997 Nov-Dec;22(6):835-48.

Related Resources

Link to article in PubMed

PubMed ID

9426801