UMMS Affiliation

Department of Neurology; Wellstone Center for FSHD

Date

3-1-2015

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Genetics and Genomics | Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience | Nervous System Diseases | Neurology

Abstract

Mutations in the gene encoding profilin 1 (PFN1) have recently been shown to cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disorder. We sequenced the PFN1 gene in a cohort of ALS patients (n = 485) and detected 2 novel variants (A20T and Q139L), as well as 4 cases with the previously identified E117G rare variant ( approximately 1.2%). A case-control meta-analysis of all published E117G ALS+/- frontotemporal dementia cases including those identified in this report was significant p = 0.001, odds ratio = 3.26 (95% confidence interval, 1.6-6.7), demonstrating this variant to be a susceptibility allele. Postmortem tissue from available patients displayed classic TAR DNA-binding protein 43 pathology. In both transient transfections and in fibroblasts from a patient with the A20T change, we showed that this novel PFN1 mutation causes protein aggregation and the formation of insoluble high molecular weight species which is a hallmark of ALS pathology. Our findings show that PFN1 is a rare cause of ALS and adds further weight to the underlying genetic heterogeneity of this disease.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Neurobiol Aging. 2015 Mar;36(3):1602.e17-27. doi: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2014.10.032. Epub 2014 Oct 31. Link to article on publisher's site

Comments

Open Access funded by Medical Research Council. Under a Creative Commons license.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

25499087

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

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