UMMS Affiliation

School of Medicine; Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine

Date

6-2017

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Cardiology | Cardiovascular Diseases | Mental and Social Health | Psychiatry and Psychology | Translational Medical Research

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Impairments in psychosocial status and cognition relate to poor clinical outcomes in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, how often these conditions co-occur and associations between burden of psychosocial and cognitive impairment and quality of life (QoL) have not been systematically examined in patients with AF.

METHODS: A total of 218 patients with symptomatic AF were enrolled in a prospective study of AF and psychosocial factors between May 2013 and October 2014 at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center. Cognitive function, depression, and anxiety were assessed at baseline and AF-specific QoL was assessed 6 months after enrollment using validated instruments. Demographic and clinical information were obtained from a structured interview and medical record review.

RESULTS: The mean age of the study participants was 63.5 +/- 10.2 years, 35% were male, and 81% had paroxysmal AF. Prevalences of impairment in 1, 2, and 3 psychosocial/cognitive domains (eg, depression, anxiety, or cognition) were 75 (34.4%), 51 (23.4%), and 16 (7.3%), respectively. Patients with co-occurring psychosocial/cognitive impairments (eg, > 1 domain) were older, more likely to smoke, had less education, and were more likely to have heart failure (all P < 0.05). Compared with participants with no psychosocial/cognitive impairments, AF-specific QoL at 6 months was significantly poorer among participants with baseline impairment in 2 (B = -13.6, 95% CI: -21.7 to -5.4) or 3 (B = -15.1, 95% CI: -28.0 to -2.2) psychosocial/cognitive domains.

CONCLUSION: Depression, anxiety, and impaired cognition were common in our cohort of patients with symptomatic AF and often co-occurred. Higher burden of psychosocial/cognitive impairment was associated with poorer AF-specific QoL.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Crit Pathw Cardiol. 2017 Jun;16(2):71-75. doi: 10.1097/HPC.0000000000000101. Link to article on publisher's site

Comments

John Bostrom is a medical student at the University of Massachusetts Medical School.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Keywords

UMCCTS funding

PubMed ID

28509707

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

 
 

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