UMMS Affiliation

Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology

Date

12-22-2000

Document Type

Article

Medical Subject Headings

Arthritis, Rheumatoid; Bone Density; Female; Humans; Joints; Male; *Osteoporosis

Disciplines

Musculoskeletal Diseases | Rheumatology | Skin and Connective Tissue Diseases | Therapeutics

Abstract

Rheumatoid arthritis represents an excellent model in which to gain insights into the local and systemic effects of joint inflammation on skeletal tissues. Three forms of bone disease have been described in rheumatoid arthritis. These include: focal bone loss affecting the immediate subchondral bone and bone at the joint margins; periarticular osteopenia adjacent to inflamed joints; and generalized osteoporosis involving the axial and appendicular skeleton. Although these three forms of bone loss have several features in common, careful histomorphometric and histopathological analysis of bone tissues from different skeletal sites, as well as the use of urinary and serum biochemical markers of bone remodeling, provide compelling evidence that different mechanisms are involved in their pathogenesis. An understanding of these distinct pathological forms of bone loss has relevance not only with respect to gaining insights into the different pathological mechanisms, but also for developing specific and effective strategies for preventing the different forms of bone loss in rheumatoid arthritis.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Arthritis Res. 2000;2(1):33-7. Epub 1999 Dec 22. Link to article on publisher's site

Comments

At the time of publication, Ellen Gravallese was not yet affiliated with the University of Massachusetts Medical School.

This publication is open access and the publisher PDF posted as allowed by the publisher's copyright policy at http://arthritis-research.com/about.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Keywords

bone loss, cytokines, osteoclast, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis

PubMed ID

11094416

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