Impact of high-dose chemotherapy on the ability to deliver subsequent local-regional radiotherapy for breast cancer: analysis of Cancer and Leukemia Group B Protocol 9082

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Radiation Oncology



Document Type


Medical Subject Headings

Adult; Aged; Analysis of Variance; Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols; effects; Breast Neoplasms; Canada; Carmustine; Cisplatin; Cyclophosphamide; Doxorubicin; Female; Fluorouracil; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Lymphatic Metastasis; Middle Aged; Multivariate Analysis; Radiotherapy Dosage


Neoplasms | Oncology | Radiology


PURPOSE: To report, from Cancer and Leukemia Group B Protocol 9082, the impact of high-dose cyclophosphamide, cisplatin, and BCNU (HD-CPB) vs. intermediate-dose CPB (ID-CPB) on the ability to start and complete the planned course of local-regional radiotherapy (RT) for women with breast cancer involving >or=10 axillary nodes.

METHODS AND MATERIALS: From 1991 to 1998, 785 patients were randomized. The HD-CPB and ID-CPB arms were balanced regarding patient characteristics. The HD-CPB and ID-CPB arms were compared on the probability of RT initiation, interruption, modification, or incompleteness. The impact of clinical variables and interactions between variables were also assessed.

RESULTS: Radiotherapy was initiated in 82% (325 of 394) of HD-CPB vs. 92% (360 of 391) of ID-CPB patients (p = 0.001). On multivariate analyses, RT was less likely given to patients who were randomized to HD treatment (odds ratio [OR] = 0 .38, p < 0.001), older (p = 0.005), African American (p = 0.003), postmastectomy (p = 0.02), or estrogen receptor positive (p = 0.03). High-dose treatment had a higher rate of RT interruption (21% vs. 12%, p = 0.001, OR = 2.05), modification (29% vs. 14%, p = 0.001, OR = 2.46), and early termination of RT (9% vs. 2%, p = 0.0001, OR = 5.35), compared with ID.

CONCLUSION: Treatment arm significantly related to initiation, interruption, modification, and early termination of RT. Patients randomized to HD-CPB were less likely to initiate RT, and of those who did, they were more likely to have RT interrupted, modified, and terminated earlier than those randomized to ID-CPB. The observed lower incidence of RT usage in African Americans vs. non-African Americans warrants further study.

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Citation: Marks LB, Cirrincione C, Fitzgerald TJ, Laurie F, Glicksman AS, Vredenburgh J, Prosnitz LR, Shpall EJ, Crump M, Richardson PG, Schuster MW, Ma J, Peterson BL, Norton L, Seagren S, Henderson IC, Hurd DD, Peters WP; Cancer and Leukemia Group B; Southwest Oncology Group; National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group. Impact of high-dose chemotherapy on the ability to deliver subsequent local-regional radiotherapy for breast cancer: analysis of Cancer and Leukemia Group B Protocol 9082. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2010 Apr;76(5):1305-13. doi: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2009.04.013. Epub 2009 Sep 9. PubMed PMID: 19747781; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3670136. Link to article on publisher's site


This study was supported in part by Grant CA-29511 from the National Cancer Institute for the IROC Rhode Island (QARC), a quality assurance vehicle and data management service for diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology for the National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials Program. QARC is a research program within the University of Massachusetts Medical School led by Dr. Thomas (TJ) FitzGerald of the Department of Radiation Oncology.

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