Title

Postsurgical treatment of early-stage breast cancer with electronic brachytherapy: outcomes and health-related quality of life at 1 year

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Radiation Oncology

Date

10-2013

Document Type

Article

Medical Subject Headings

Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; *Brachytherapy; Breast Neoplasms; Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast; Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Middle Aged; Neoplasm Grading; Neoplasm Invasiveness; Neoplasm Recurrence, Local; Prognosis; *Quality of Life; Registries; Survival Rate

Disciplines

Neoplasms | Oncology

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: This multicenter registry followed up patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery and electronic brachytherapy (EBT). This report provides 1- and 2-year updates to the initial publication.

METHODS: Patients were of age 50 years or more with invasive carcinoma or ductal carcinoma in situ, tumor size

RESULTS: Of the 69 patients enrolled, 62 were evaluated at 1 year and 20 patients at 2 years after treatment. At 1 year, 28 (45.2%) patients reported adverse events that were possibly, probably, or definitely related to treatment. Most (90%) were grade 1: manageable and typical of radiation therapy. Four events were grade 2: induration/firmness (2), field contracture (1), and seroma (1). One event was grade 3: a draining fistula at the lumpectomy site due to residual effects of a breast infection at 1 month. No recurrences have been reported. Cosmetic ratings were excellent or good in 93.4% of patients at 1 year. Most patients (69%) were energetic most or all of the time. Most patients (69% to 98%) were not affected by individual symptoms of breast disease at 1 year. Generally patients who had an adverse event did not report the corresponding symptom on the quality-of-life questionnaire.

CONCLUSIONS: This registry followed up patients with early-stage breast cancer at 1 and 2 years after breast-conserving surgery and EBT. No recurrences have been reported, and adverse effects were acceptable.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Am J Clin Oncol. 2013 Oct;36(5):430-5. doi: 10.1097/COC.0b013e31825493bb. Link to article on publisher's site

Comments

At the time of publication, Bruce A. Bornstein was not affiliated yet with the University of Massachusetts Medical School.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed