Title

Career differences between primary care and traditional trainees in internal medicine and pediatrics

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Quantitative Health Sciences

Date

3-15-1992

Document Type

Article

Medical Subject Headings

*Career Choice; Follow-Up Studies; Internal Medicine; Internship and Residency; Multivariate Analysis; Pediatrics; Primary Health Care; Professional Practice Location; Specialty Boards; United States

Disciplines

Biostatistics | Epidemiology | Health Services Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To assess the relation of Primary Care Residency Training to career choice, board certification, and practice location of internists and pediatricians.

DESIGN: Cohort study with up to 8 years of follow-up.

SETTING: The United States.

PARTICIPANTS: The 17,933 residents trained in all internal medicine (13,750) and pediatrics (4,183) residency programs between 1977 and 1982 were studied using information from the National Resident Matching Program, the AMA Physician Masterfile, the Area Resource File, and a telephone survey.

MEASUREMENTS: Career choice, board certification, and practice location were studied in relation to five explanatory variables: type of residency (primary care or traditional track), gender, year of medical school graduation, educational orientation of the teaching hospital, and medical school prestige.

MAIN RESULTS: Graduates of primary care residency training programs chose careers in generalist primary care significantly more often than did graduates of traditional tracks in both internal medicine (72% compared with 54%) and pediatrics (88% and 81%, respectively; P less than 0.001 for both values). Board certification rates in internal medicine were statistically higher for graduates of primary care training programs (80%) than for graduates of traditional programs (76%, P = 0.002) but were not statistically significant for both groups of pediatric graduates. Graduates of primary care programs in pediatrics and internal medicine practiced in medically less served communities more often than did graduates of traditional programs.

CONCLUSION: Graduates of primary care residency training programs in internal medicine and pediatrics differ from graduates of traditional residency programs in career choices, board certification rates, and practice locations.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Ann Intern Med. 1992 Mar 15;116(6):482-7. Link to article on publisher's site

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed