Title

Contemporary Prevalence and Correlates of Incident Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Quantitative Health Sciences; Meyers Primary Care Institute; Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine; Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine

Date

5-2013

Document Type

Article

Medical Subject Headings

Heart Failure; Stroke Volume; Ventricular Dysfunction, Left; Ventricular Function, Left

Disciplines

Cardiology | Cardiovascular Diseases | Epidemiology | Geriatrics | Health Services Research

Abstract

BACKGROUND: We assessed the prevalence of preserved left ventricular ejection fraction in patients with incident heart failure and differences in the demographic and clinical characteristics that may differentiate patients presenting with heart failure with preserved versus reduced left ventricular ejection fraction.

METHODS: We identified all patients with newly diagnosed heart failure between 2005 and 2008 from 4 sites in the Cardiovascular Research Network on the basis of hospital discharge and ambulatory visit diagnoses, and assigned a category of preserved, borderline, or reduced left ventricular ejection fraction using data from electronic databases and chart review.

RESULTS: We identified 11,994 patients with incident heart failure; of these, 6210 (51.8%) had preserved left ventricular ejection fraction, 1870 (15.6%) had borderline systolic dysfunction, and 3914 (32.6%) had reduced left ventricular ejection fraction. For those with heart failure with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction, the mean age was 74.7 years and 57.1% were women; for those with borderline systolic dysfunction, the mean age was 71.6 years and 38.4% were women; and for those with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction, the mean age was 69.1 years and 32.6% were women. Compared with white patients, black patients were less likely to have heart failure with preserved systolic function. Those with a history of coronary artery bypass surgery, mitral or aortic valvular disease, atrial fibrillation or flutter, or a diagnosis of hypertension were more likely to have heart failure with preserved systolic function, as were those with a diverse range of noncardiac comorbid conditions, including chronic lung disease, chronic liver disease, a history of a hospitalized bleed, a history of a mechanical fall, a diagnosis of depression, and a diagnosis of dementia. Patients with a history of acute myocardial infarction and a history of ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia were less likely to have heart failure with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. Patients with higher systolic blood pressures at baseline and lower low-density lipoprotein levels were more likely to have heart failure with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction, as were those with lower hemoglobin levels and the lowest glomerular filtration rates.

CONCLUSIONS: Heart failure with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction is the most common form of the heart failure syndrome among patients newly presenting with this condition, and women and older adults are especially affected. Evidence-based treatment strategies apply to less than one third of patients with newly diagnosed heart failure.

Comments

Citation: Am J Med. 2013 May;126(5):393-400. doi: 10.1016/j.amjmed.2012.10.022. Link to article on publisher's site

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Keywords

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