UMMS Affiliation

Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine; Division of Cardiovascular Medicine; Department of Quantitative Health Sciences; Meyers Primary Care Institute

Date

2-1-2013

Document Type

Article

Medical Subject Headings

Atrial Fibrillation; Heart Failure; Stroke Volume; Ventricular Function, Left

Disciplines

Cardiology | Cardiovascular Diseases | Clinical Epidemiology | Epidemiology | Health Services Research

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation (AF) and heart failure (HF) are 2 of the most common cardiovascular conditions nationally and AF frequently complicates HF. We examined how AF has impacts on adverse outcomes in HF-PEF versus HF-REF within a large, contemporary cohort.

METHODS AND RESULTS: We identified all adults diagnosed with HF-PEF or HF-REF based on hospital discharge and ambulatory visit diagnoses and relevant imaging results for 2005-2008 from 4 health plans in the Cardiovascular Research Network. Data on demographic features, diagnoses, procedures, outpatient pharmacy use, and laboratory results were ascertained from health plan databases. Hospitalizations for HF, stroke, and any reason were identified from hospital discharge and billing claims databases. Deaths were ascertained from health plan and state death files. Among 23 644 patients with HF, 11 429 (48.3%) had documented AF (9081 preexisting, 2348 incident). Compared with patients who did not have AF, patients with AF had higher adjusted rates of ischemic stroke (hazard ratio [HR] 2.47 for incident AF; HR 1.57 for preexisting AF), hospitalization for HF (HR 2.00 for incident AF; HR 1.22 for preexisting AF), all-cause hospitalization (HR 1.45 for incident AF; HR 1.15 for preexisting AF), and death (incident AF HR 1.67; preexisting AF HR 1.13). The associations of AF with these outcomes were similar for HF-PEF and HF-REF, with the exception of ischemic stroke.

CONCLUSIONS: AF is a potent risk factor for adverse outcomes in patients with HF-PEF or HF-REF. Effective interventions are needed to improve the prognosis of these high-risk patients.

Comments

Citation: J Am Heart Assoc. 2013 Feb 1;2(1):e005694. doi: 10.1161/JAHA.112.005694. Link to article on publisher's site

© 2013 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley‐Blackwell. This is an Open Access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Keywords

UMCCTS funding

 
 

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