Title

Decreased cortical thickness in drug naive first episode schizophrenia: in relation to serum levels of BDNF

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Psychiatry

Date

1-2015

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Mental and Social Health | Psychiatry | Psychiatry and Psychology

Abstract

This study was to examine cortical thickness in drug naive, first episode schizophrenia patients, and to explore its relationship with serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Forty-five drug naive schizophrenia patients and 28 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Freesurfer was used to parcellate cortical regions, and vertex-wise group analysis was used for whole brain cortical thickness. The clusters for the brain regions that demonstrated group differences were extracted, and the mean values of thickness were calculated. Serum levels of BDNF were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). After controlling for age and gender, significantly thinner cortical thickness was found in left insula and superior temporal gyrus in the patient group compared with the healthy control group (HC group) (p's < 0.001). Lower serum levels of BDNF were also found in the patient group compared with the HC group (p = 0.001). Correlation analysis showed a significant positive relationship between thickness of left insula and serum levels of BDNF within the HC group (r = 0.396, p = 0.037) but there was no such relationship within the patient group (r = 0.035, p = 0.819). Cortical thinning is present in drug naive, first episode schizophrenia patients, indicating neurodevelopmental abnormalities at the onset of schizophrenia. Left insula might be an imaging biomarker in detecting the impaired protective role of neurotrophic factor for the brain development in schizophrenia.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Song X, Quan M, Lv L, Li X, Pang L, Kennedy D, Hodge S, Harrington A, Ziedonis D, Fan X. Decreased cortical thickness in drug naïve first episode schizophrenia: in relation to serum levels of BDNF. J Psychiatr Res. 2015 Jan;60:22-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2014.09.009. Epub 2014 Sep 19. PubMed PMID: 25282282. Link to article on publisher's site

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

25282282